Friday, March 24, 2006

Holy Shit!!!!

It launched. It really launched.

Holy shit.

Digg It!

43 comments:

inigmatus said...

Rockers.

Tony Plank said...

Awesome!

Tony Plank said...

A shame that my streaming video didn't work...well, it worked for a second and teased me with some awesome shots.

Ed said...

Congratulations. The streaming video died a few seconds after liftoff, but I did see a view from the rocket as it ascended. Way to go guys!

jmendez said...

Sweet! The feed died for us around +8! Post some video!!

Dick Stafford said...

My video feed held in until the on-board footage started. That was purty darned cool!

Colin said...

"We did lose the vehicle," says Gwynne Shotwell, SpaceX vice president of business development.

Kevin Parkin said...

How's the trajectory?

malaclypse said...

trajectory: downwards in many peices ;_;

inigmatus said...

I thought that's what I saw... blanket pulling the rocket?

Sabrina Yohai said...

How is everybody getting the current info??

Kevin Parkin said...

oh no :(

inigmatus said...

Falcon 1.A, may she rest in peace. May her sisters fair much better with the sacrice of their brave sibling. Pick up the pieces, learn, and move on! Go SpaceX go. Really good try.

Kevin Parkin said...

Still, first time is pretty unheard of. In fact I can't think of any new launcher that worked first time except Shuttle.

inigmatus said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
inigmatus said...

Last I saw the feed facing down from the rocket, I saw ocean, clouds, not very good signs. Not sure, but I think the thermal blanket or something held on to the rocket during lift off - of course, this is only speculation, probably better reserved for an official statement from SpaceX pending an investigation. I look foward to seeing the next Falcon 1 flying. No doubt much will be learned from what has happened - valuable information for the future that can only come from a live launch. :)

raptorantill said...

Kwaj Net blocked the live feed. Sorry to hear the missile had to be aborted. Great try SpaceX.

Ed said...

Dammit.

ザイツェヴ said...

This is very unfortunate and I'd like to offer SpaceXers my sympathies. Elon said before that he won't quit until after 3rd failure, so there's a hope that this setback can be overcome.

Regarding Kevin's comments, I seem to recall that Energia and Saturn V worked on the first try as well. But yes, it does not seem that majority of boosters do that.

The_Rocketeer said...

The Saturn V worked on its first
launch. But they had a slighly larger
budget. Good attempt guys at SPACEX
hope you can iron out the problems
and try again soon.

inigmatus said...

Isn't there a shutoff switch for the rocket rather than aborting the flight by demolition? Does anyone know if the rocket is recoverable?

Tony Plank said...

bummer.

My best wishes to everyone on the team. You have a lot of well wishers out here.

raptorantill said...

Due to the locationa nd population of the area it is aborted and destoryed rather than come down on the islands I think

Gisela Giardino said...

=´(

Sabrina Yohai said...

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/11997932/

Steve Jurvetson said...

bummer. we were very excited on the flickr blog.

latest photo I had

inigmatus said...

Elon says that she made it past the launch pad, so nothing held on to her. She was lost later in stage 1 burn.

EricR said...

raptorantill said: "Due to the locationa nd population of the area it is aborted and destoryed rather than come down on the islands I think"

No, the Falcon uses thrust termination rather than an explosive or destructive abort.

Hopefully it remained intact and it's not thousands of feet below.

EricR said...

Steve,

Thanks for the link to the picture!

It's hard to tell, but I think yours might be a fraction of a second later than the one posted at spaceflightnow.com

http://spaceflightnow.com/falcon/f1/images/onboard.jpg

Did you happen to grab any frames *just before* the last one?

It would be interesting to compare some of the earlier frames to that last one.

Steve Jurvetson said...

ericr: I thinkl you are right. I have four photos from the nose cone cam, including one later than these. I can email them to whoever is interested. Just email me at my initials at dfj.com

inigmatus said...

My last view from the rocket before the feed cut was a picture of the sky and clouds as she flew negatively horizontal toward the ocean with the exaust trail reflecting a spin. I didn't see a flame as some conjecture on http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/

If anything, I believe the rocket may be buried nose first into the ocean floor.

TomatoPie said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
EricR said...

A shot of the supposedly last frame from the Falcon can be found here:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=1924&start=301&posts=302

If this picture isn't someones fabrication then when Spacex says they lost the vehicle they really mean they *lost*the*vehicle*.

EricR said...

Inigmatus,

Wow, do I understand you correctly? You saw her heading back to earth under power?

She was still very much nose-up when the feed we were watching cut out.

inigmatus said...

I last saw a spining exahust trail and blue sky or ocean with clouds.

But I think this is one of the last frames received:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums/get-attachment.asp?action=view&attachmentid=3916

EricR said...

Rats, Rats, Rats.

Looks like she exploded. I was hoping she just fell into the ocean.

This could make it much harder to figure out what went wrong.

blueguitarbob said...

Full video of the launch from t-10sec to impact w/ ocean:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums/thread-view.asp?tid=1950&posts=1#M27148

Nasaspaceflight forum membership necessary, but free...

blueguitarbob said...

ok, so I'll break the full URL:

http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums
/thread-view.asp?tid=1950&posts=1#M27148

inigmatus said...

Yes, upon review of the video, the frame I posted was of a flare up of the nozzle - a frame that my feed skipped when I watched it live an assumed it was its last. I was right, she headed to the ocean on her own power.

inigmatus said...

..and upon further review of the video, it does look like the thermal blanket never seperated completely from the rocket as I suspected, which might have damaged the nozzle, which put her into an uncontrolled spin which I saw, as she screamed to her death toward an ocean plunge. In all likelihood, she probably broke into lots of pieces when it impacted the surface, which means that she is probably littered all over the ocean floor - unrecoverable. Well hey, it was a spectacular dance while it lasted! May she rest in peace. No pun intended.

JayeRandom said...

The last few seconds of video definitely showed an orange flame streaming off to the right:
http://img359.imageshack.us/img359/9380/falcon1flame5ln.jpg

Orlin said...

Anyway, there was liftoff!
And there must be further and succesfull ones.

RocketMan said...

In addition to Shuttle and Saturn V, the first launches of the Titan II Gemini version, the Titan III, the Titan II SLV version, the Titan IV, Atlas 2, Atlas 3 and Atlas V all carried valuable spacecraft and worked.